Buy 2 get 1 FREE. Anne Frank: The Diary of a Young Girl – Anne Frank, B.M. Mooyaart, Eleanor Roosevelt
Buy 2 get 1 FREE. Anne Frank: The Diary of a Young Girl – Anne Frank, B.M. Mooyaart, Eleanor Roosevelt
Buy 2 get 1 FREE. Anne Frank: The Diary of a Young Girl – Anne Frank, B.M. Mooyaart, Eleanor Roosevelt
Buy 2 get 1 FREE. Anne Frank: The Diary of a Young Girl – Anne Frank, B.M. Mooyaart, Eleanor Roosevelt
Buy 2 get 1 FREE. Anne Frank: The Diary of a Young Girl – Anne Frank, B.M. Mooyaart, Eleanor Roosevelt

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Buy 2 get 1 FREE. Terms & Conditions Apply. Consigned item sold "As Is/ Where Is" with no guarantees, warranties, refunds or exchanges. Not for the fussy. bookmemorylane Discovered in the attic in which she spent the last years of her life, Anne Frank’s remarkable diary has since become a world classic—a powerful reminder of the horrors of war and an eloquent testament to the human spirit. In 1942, with Nazis occupying Holland, a thirteen-year-old Jewish girl and her family fled their home in Amsterdam and went into hiding. For the next two years, until their whereabouts were betrayed to the Gestapo, they and another family lived cloistered in the “Secret Annex” of an old office building. Cut off from the outside world, they faced hunger, boredom, the constant cruelties of living in confined quarters, and the ever-present threat of discovery and death. In her diary Anne Frank recorded vivid impressions of her experiences during this period. By turns thoughtful, moving, and amusing, her account offers a fascinating commentary on human courage and frailty and a compelling self-portrait of a sensitive and spirited young woman whose promise was tragically cut short. Praise for The Diary of a Young Girl “A truly remarkable book.”—The New York Times “One of the most moving personal documents to come out of World War II.”—The Philadelphia Inquirer “There may be no better way to commemorate the fiftieth anniversary of the end of World War II than to reread The Diary of a Young Girl, a testament to an indestructible nobility of spirit in the face of pure evil.”—Chicago Tribune “The single most compelling personal account of the Holocaust . . . remains astonishing and excruciating.”—The New York Times Book Review “How brilliantly Anne Frank captures the self-conscious alienation and naïve self-absorption of adolescence.”—Newsday Editorial Reviews Amazon.com Review A beloved classic since its initial publication in 1947, this vivid, insightful journal is a fitting memorial to the gifted Jewish teenager who died at Bergen-Belsen, Germany, in 1945. Born in 1929, Anne Frank received a blank diary on her 13th birthday, just weeks before she and her family went into hiding in Nazi-occupied Amsterdam. Her marvelously detailed, engagingly personal entries chronicle 25 trying months of claustrophobic, quarrelsome intimacy with her parents, sister, a second family, and a middle-aged dentist who has little tolerance for Anne's vivacity. The diary's universal appeal stems from its riveting blend of the grubby particulars of life during wartime (scant, bad food; shabby, outgrown clothes that can't be replaced; constant fear of discovery) and candid discussion of emotions familiar to every adolescent (everyone criticizes me, no one sees my real nature, when will I be loved?). Yet Frank was no ordinary teen: the later entries reveal a sense of compassion and a spiritual depth remarkable in a girl barely 15. Her death epitomizes the madness of the Holocaust, but for the millions who meet Anne through her diary, it is also a very individual loss. --Wendy Smith From Publishers Weekly This startling new edition of Dutch Jewish teenager Anne Frank's classic diary?written in an Amsterdam warehouse, where for two years she hid from the Nazis with her family and friends?contains approximately 30% more material than the original 1947 edition. It completely revises our understanding of one of the most moving and eloquent documents of the Holocaust. The Anne we meet here is much more sarcastic, rebellious and vulnerable than the sensitive diarist beloved by millions. She rages at her mother, Edith, smolders with jealous resentment toward her sister, Margot, and unleashes acid comments at her roommates. Expanded entries provide a fuller picture of the tensions and quarrels among the eight people in hiding. Anne, who died in the Bergen-Belsen concentration camp in March 1945, three months before her 16th birthday, candidly discusses her awakening sexuality in entries that were omitted from the 1947 edition by her father, Otto, the only one of the eight to survive the death camps. He died in 1980. This crisp, stunning translation provides an unvarnished picture of life in the "secret annex." In the end, Anne's teen angst pales beside her profound insights, her self-discovery and her unbroken faith in good triumphing over evil. Photos not seen by PW. Copyright 1995 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title. From Library Journal This new translation of Frank's famous diary includes material about her emerging sexuality and her relationship with her mother that was originally excised by Frank's father, the only family member to survive the Holocaust. Copyright 1994 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title. Language Notes Text: English, Dutch (translation) --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title. From the Back Cover "The new edition reveals a new depth to Anne's dreams, irritations, hardship, and passions . . . There may be no better way to commemorate the fiftieth anniversary of the end of World War II than to reread The Diary of a Young Girl, a testament to an indestructivle nobility of spirit in the face of pure evil."--Chicago Tribune --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title. About the Author Anne Frank was born in 1929 in Germany. Her family moved to Amsterdam in 1933, and she died in the Bergen-Belsen concentration camp in 1945. From AudioFile While Anne Frank's diary is well known, her short stories are not. In a soft voice, Kathe Mazur reads her series of vignettes of life in the Netherlands, written while she was in hiding between 1942 and 1944. Through these tales, the listener learns more about the daily life of Anne's family and the others in their small quarters. Mazur's voice often reflects the tedium of the daily routine. At other times, her intonation suggests the stressful situations Anne recounts in these stories. The tales contain few references to the Germans or the war, or the terror of living in hiding. While Mazur's voice sounds too mature for 13-15-year-old Anne, her engaging delivery captures Anne's charm and energy. M.B.K. © AudioFile 2010, Portland, Maine --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title. Top customer reviews 5.0 out of 5 starsReview of New Version on Kindle ByJDon October 3, 2016 Format: Kindle Edition|Verified Purchase I first read this book (the edited down version) when I was nine years old, I received the book as a gift, and again when I was twelve for school. I recently re-read the book (the new un-edited version) and coming from an entirely different perspective now that I am a thirty year old mother. First, I want to say that I absolutely believe that this book should still be included in school curriculum. The only thing 'new' about it is that pages and passages were added. Nothing was taken out and the translation was not changed. Reports that the book is so different that it's nothing like the original are false. Reports that the story is different are false. There is no reason for the edited version to still be used because children read Anne Frank's diary around ages 11-14 years old which was around age when Anne herself was writing the diary. Anything that could be seen as supposedly "inappropriate" can be seen on daytime television with a PG or maybe PG-13 rating. Especially these days, there's definitely nothing in there that is beyond the norm for the average tween-teen. I think that continuing to use an edited version is insulting to Anne Frank's memory. Not only that, but it provides valuable information about the time period and gives more relateability to the diary. The passages which are included in the new version are not anything that the average 8-12 year old girl does not already know about her own body and the "birds and the bees", and are so few and short that they comprise a tiny percentage of the work itself. The romance between herself and Peter is very chaste and nothing untoward happens in the story. (Spoiler: they hold hands and a kiss a few times. that's it.) The passages that some see as inappropriate are not at all titillating, a medical textbook is more erotic. Coming from a mom's point of view, I would definitely allow my daughter to read the unedited book. I think this should stay on school book lists because some kids these days see the Holocaust as something that happened a long time ago that is meaningless now, without realizing that genocides and racial motivated violence still happens every day. I think it seems to them like just another thing they have to learn about along with The Hundred Years War and the Crusades. Anne Frank's diary gives kids perspective and helps makes the tragic loss of life during WWII a tangible thing they can understand. The diary is so relate-able and reflects so many feelings that all teens have had, that she becomes three dimensional to them and no longer a just some person that died a long time ago. This sensitivity towards the loss of a life is what we need now in the times we live in. As we read the diary we see how much potential was lost not only in Anne but in her entire family. Anne Frank was an intelligent and well-read young woman who studied multiple languages and had an analytical mind. I believe we lost a shining beacon of women's intelligence when she died. She was an emerging feminist, activist, and writer! I think she would have been an amazing woman who would have gone on to do great things. All that potential was lost millions of times over during WWII, and this is what we feel deep in our hearts upon closing the book. Most of the book is about the privations and hardship of living hidden away in the "annex". There is very little coverage of the violence of the times or much that is going on in the outside world because they had little knowledge of it since they were hidden. I think this is partly why some schoolchildren report the diary is boring. It does get repetitive at times, which reflects the feelings of those living in hiding. They had to wait and wait in fear, not knowing what the next day would bring. There are many self-reflective passages where Anne laments being picked on by the adults in the annex, wondering if she will live up to the expectations they have for her, hoping she can reach her goals. There is a thread of hope apparent even in her most depressing writings. I think these are the parts I think teens find most relate-able because all teens want to achieve things, please their parents, and find hope in their moments of despair. Toward the end of the diary we see just how difficult things have become for the family which is not always accurately represented in the movie versions of the diary. They were starving, never full at meals, and having to exist off moldy and tasteless food. There was one bathroom for eight people and at times the toilet could not be flushed. They had threadbare, holey clothing which was too small. The cat used the bathroom wherever it wanted towards the end, and their helpers came less and less frequently as circumstances got worse and worse. Their conditions deteriorated in ways that children living in the comfort of the 21st century could never imagine. It's so important for kids to read about these conditions and contrast them with their own in order to not only feel grateful but to feel sympathy for those who lived in these terrible times. The Kindle version had fairly large print and worked just fine on my phone and tablet with no issues. The new version has a new introduction and I believe the epilogue has changed a bit as well. I enjoyed the footnotes feature which allows you to touch the number which takes you to the footnotes page, then when you touch the number again it takes you back to the page you were originally on. I had no problems purchasing or downloading. If you want to know more about what happened to Anne Frank after the diary, there is a book called "The Last Seven Months of Anne Frank" by Willy Lindwer which includes stories from people who met her in the camps. Another recommendation is the author Eva Schloss who was Anne Frank's stepsister, who wrote about surviving Auschwitz. Read more 5 comments| 102 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Report abuse 5.0 out of 5 starsI tried to imagine what it would be like to have to be totally quiet ByBettyLouon June 7, 2016 Format: Kindle Edition|Verified Purchase This book was fascinating. I was a little surprised that there wasn't more about the atrocities that were happening around them instead of all the turmoil in the household. However, I realize that she was just a very young girl. And, I was surprised about how sexually aware she was. Until she and her family went into hiding, she hadn't had a lot of worldly awareness so she wrote about what was happening around her, and that was everything that went on in that household with those people. It would be hard to imagine how I or any other person would react under the same circumstances. I tried to imagine what it would be like to have to be totally quiet...not to be able to even move around at all for several hours or not be able to use the bathroom when you needed to. I thought what would happen if you had a cold, and were coughing. How could you control it? After she would write about her feelings when certain things were going on inside, she would put a small notation about what was happening in the world outside. They would get news from the outside from those who were hiding them. Another thing that surprised me was the gifts they would give each other on their birthdays. I would have thought that those things would have been rationed and not be available. I guess if you had the money, and apparently they had quite a lot, the regular Germans could still buy "things". Everything I have previously read about that time period indicated that even the "non-Jewish" German people had very little. She talks about being able to make jam from strawberries that were delivered to the warehouse. That would take lots of sugar. Apparently, the factory that they lived above was the factory that her father was a partner in, and they made pectin there. So maybe, the delivery of sugar wasn't suspicious. Or maybe that was what made them vulnerable. However, someone had to have turned them in or they would never have found them behind the bookcase in the annex. I felt sad that her relationship with her mother was so bad. I think, had she live, that relationship might have been repaired with time as it appeared to be mostly misunderstandings combined with her adolescence. Also, her relationship with her sister wasn't good either. Her relationship with the other family was understandable considering the close quarters they shared. It has occurred to me that the Jewish people are a very gentle kind of people therefore enabling them to live under those circumstances for two years. I think it would be almost impossible for most people to live like that. I can't understand why anyone would turn them in to the Gestapo knowing they would be going to their death. Most of their German Christian and Catholic friends were wonderful people who actually put their lives on the line to protect these two families. I have never heard who turned them in. They almost made it. Anne lives on just as she wished. I would highly recommend this book to anyone who is interested in reliving the past with Anne, her family, and friends. Read more Comment| 7 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Report abuse 5.0 out of 5 starsIt's not surprising to me that Anne wrote so well; this is not a fiction after all; it was her life. ByEvieon March 17, 2017 Format: Kindle Edition|Verified Purchase An amazingly talented young writer. The struggles, emotions and fears are so well described by someone so young... but this fact, has been mentioned by many other reviewers. What I'd like to add is, it's not surprising to me that Anne wrote so well; this is not a fiction after all; it was her life. It was a daily struggle to endure and maintain sanity; it didn't happen. How could it? So many people? In such a relatively small, confined space, had no hope but to lose sight of reality to a greater or lesser degree (dependent on the strength of each individual). Anne herself, was dealing (not only) with the horror of war on the outside of their hideout, but also with the confusion of being a teenager, plus, the difficulty of having to share close quarters with multiple personalities. What surprises me, is that they managed to exist for as long as they did. A horrid and frightening glimpse into the world of a handful of people, who tried, valiantly, to survive genocide... https://www.amazon.com/Anne-Frank-Diary-Young-Girl/dp/0553296981


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